Dead foxes.

An area for discussion of problems with pests and predators. WARNING: People are discussing problems with predators, that includes things such as fox and bird of prey attack. Such posts may not be nice viewing, but are acceptable.

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chuck1

Re: Dead foxes.

Post by chuck1 » 04 Oct 2012, 00:34

Some hang them up as trophies rather than to deter other foxes. There is little that you can do to keep foxes away, just cull them to try to keep the population down.

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drfish
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Re: Dead foxes.

Post by drfish » 04 Oct 2012, 09:32

I know the same practice is used with squirrels, so I don't see why it wouldn't work with foxes. The fox doesn't need to see the bodies, just the scent is probably enough of a warning to at the very least be wary. However, as chuck said above, it won't stop them, they are cunning, and they will eventually try their luck if they are desperate for food. As a temporary measure, I'd imagine it works to some degree.

Just get a decent sized guard dog, preferably a capable one too. Or a Wolf hybrid would be even better. Foxes have a natural fear of Wolves.
Giving power to politicians is like giving whiskey and car keys to a teenage boy - P. J. O'Rourke (thanks Jessie)

It's amazing that people can believe everything is predestined but they still look both ways when crossing the road - Stephen Hawking

1 Wife, 3 children, 1 Staffie Bitch (RIP Marley), 1 Chi-Chi, 1 Tuxedo Cat, 1 part Maine Coon cat, male bearded dragon, Horsefield Tortoise, 2 White Silkies, 1 Frizzle Pekin, 1 CLB, 1 Appenzeller Spitzhauben Cockerel, 1 blue laced Wyandotte, 3 Appenzeller x Wynadotte pullets, 1 Call drake, 3 khaki Campbell ducks, 4 (2 male 2 female?) Aylesbury x Campbells, a breeding colony of Dubia cockroaches.

And a lot of Ibuprofen.

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Wilt
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Re: Dead foxes.

Post by Wilt » 04 Oct 2012, 10:12

Ah, but they might have all approaches adorned thike that!!! ;)
Chickens, are also food for the soul!

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Re: Dead foxes.

Post by Wilt » 04 Oct 2012, 10:17

NannyP wrote::lol: :lol:

I am going to kill your avator Wilt! :munky2:
How about this one?
Chickens, are also food for the soul!

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Totally Clucked

Re: Dead foxes.

Post by Totally Clucked » 01 Nov 2012, 08:58

It doesn"t deter other foxes from visiting, it was a custom started by gamekeepers many years ago when all predators both bird and animal were hung on the gamekeepers gibbet, this indicated to his master at a glance that he was doing his job protecting game on the estate, though on many estates it was frowned upon to kill foxes as these were required for the local hunt and the act of foxicide could even be a sackable offense,

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Re: Dead foxes.

Post by Wildybeast » 20 Nov 2012, 09:47

Hi folks,

Just wanted to add my two pennies worth !

Its not a good idea to display dead foxes by a road as depicted in the photo.

Not all people who use the road appreciate the problem caused by Charlie to farmers, poultry keepers etc.

It could cause distress to passers bye, especially children.

I have sometimes left foxes on display for the farmer to see. Usually to demonstrate the extent of the problem and also to prove my value and worth to him/her.

However, this is done by agreement and not in a place that will cause offence. Shooting has a bad enough problem as it is without making the problem worse. I also remove the carcasses the next night and dispose of them appropriately.

Also, It does not deter foxes from returning. The blood and odour actually attracts them.

Human/Lion pee does work to some extent. Due to the testosterone content.

By far the best way to deter them is to call me !!! .... lol Electric fencing also works.

Just my thought's .... not intended to offend anyones opinion.

Jim.

Kalynta

Re: Dead foxes.

Post by Kalynta » 21 Nov 2012, 19:30

drfish wrote:
Just get a decent sized guard dog, preferably a capable one too. Or a Wolf hybrid would be even better. Foxes have a natural fear of Wolves.
Maybe I could rent mine out then...... :scratch:

Or maybe...... a little enterprise of bottled wolfdog pee :-k

It would certainly explain why Mr Foxy steers clear of my chickens.

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Wilt
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Re: Dead foxes.

Post by Wilt » 22 Nov 2012, 08:20

All domesticated dogs ( canis lupus familiaris) are thought to be descendants from your lovely beasts being Canis lupus or Canis lupus lupus, I would have thought. We say dog's in general can smell or scent in colour, or at least with great accuracy.

It seems (to me at any rate) an oversimplification that all common dog breeds are extract of Lupus (a bit like Brahmas come from the tiny jungle fowl :? ), Why would not or could not some domesticated dogs be descendants of Vulpes?

Would this not give the thought, that some dogs waste matter would give the no entry signal, but others (possibly smaller breeds) act like a welcome card?? :roll: :?
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drfish
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Re: Dead foxes.

Post by drfish » 22 Nov 2012, 10:54

This is something I've looked into over the years, and there's a great deal of speculation and theory to the contrary, but evidence supports that no common dog breed carried any Vulpes DNA. There have been cases of deliberate interbreeding of species, but all intents and purposes, they are as different as tigers and domestic cats. There's very little evidence to support that the lupis and vulpes species have ever bred with each other during their known history. But like you, Wilt, I find that extremely difficult to believe. As I say, some sceptics believe that the early evolution possibly led the two species to breed, but the common forms of both these days have entirely different DNA, sharing only a few similarities.

But with regards the scent thing, I agree, I think a fox would be able to establish from excretions alone, what the animal is, how big it is, whether it's territorial and if it's a threat. These are evolutionary traits that all wild dogs live by.
Giving power to politicians is like giving whiskey and car keys to a teenage boy - P. J. O'Rourke (thanks Jessie)

It's amazing that people can believe everything is predestined but they still look both ways when crossing the road - Stephen Hawking

1 Wife, 3 children, 1 Staffie Bitch (RIP Marley), 1 Chi-Chi, 1 Tuxedo Cat, 1 part Maine Coon cat, male bearded dragon, Horsefield Tortoise, 2 White Silkies, 1 Frizzle Pekin, 1 CLB, 1 Appenzeller Spitzhauben Cockerel, 1 blue laced Wyandotte, 3 Appenzeller x Wynadotte pullets, 1 Call drake, 3 khaki Campbell ducks, 4 (2 male 2 female?) Aylesbury x Campbells, a breeding colony of Dubia cockroaches.

And a lot of Ibuprofen.

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